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Archive for the ‘Louwie’ Category

Gaan wandel ons vandag met die honde by Jan Smuts se huis op sy wandelpad teen die koppie uit. Net maar 2.4km of so, maar genoeg om die ouman se lyf te beproef.

             En oral in die veld staan hierdie pragtige blomme; Scadoxus puniceus, ook genoem bloodlily, rooikwas, paintbrush lily, isiphompho en ook umgalo.

“The intimate rapport with nature is one of the most precious things in life. Nature is indeed very close to us; sometimes closer than hands and feet, of which in truth she is but the extension. The emotional appeal of nature is tremendous, sometimes almost more than one can bear.” aldus oom Jannie.

Dit was ook meer as wat die nuwe baba in die huis kon “bear”. Met sulke kort beentjies kon sy nie die pas volhou nie en het sy kort kort daarop aangedring om gedra te word.

n hand vol vuur

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Ja Kempton, nie Joshua nie!

Na gister se reën het die Maan vroeg aand wegruipertjie gespeel in die wolke. (fotos nie so goed nie, Hannelie sal eers moet Photoshop!)

En vanoggend vroeg het die mis die stadsgeraas vir ons sag gedemp sodat Sondag kon begin soos dit, dink ek, veronderstel is om te begin, eerbiedig en vreedsaam … en toe dink ek aan my ma. Sy het ook van mistige weer gehou. Dit het n kalmerende uitwerking op haar gehad. Toe loop ek hierdie skrywe oor haar eie ma deur Ursula K Le Guin raak:

Presies dieselfde boom van gister met mis in die agtergrond.

En straat op versluier die mis die omgewing. Pragtig.

Ursula K. Le Guin on Aging and What Beauty Really Means

“My mother died at eighty-three, of cancer, in pain, her spleen enlarged so that her body was misshapen. Is that the person I see when I think of her? Sometimes. I wish it were not. It is a true image, yet it blurs, it clouds, a truer image. It is one memory among fifty years of memories of my mother. It is the last in time. Beneath it, behind it is a deeper, complex, ever-changing image, made from imagination, hearsay, photographs, memories. I see a little red-haired child in the mountains of Colorado, a sad-faced, delicate college girl, a kind, smiling young mother, a brilliantly intellectual woman, a peerless flirt, a serious artist, a splendid cook—I see her rocking, weeding, writing, laughing — I see the turquoise bracelets on her delicate, freckled arm — I see, for a moment, all that at once, I glimpse what no mirror can reflect, the spirit flashing out across the years, beautiful.”

Uit haar boek: ‘The wave in the mind’

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n Tuin vol Somer

Eerste Rose.

Inkalelies

Na die reën

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The conclusion of Krista Tippett’s interview with Richard Rohr as promissed. Another 7 pages of this very interesting talk with a comment or two of my own inserted in red.

Lees en word dalk ietwat wyser as wat jy voorheen was.

 

What we plant in the soil of contemplation, we shall reap in the harvest of action. –Meister Eckhart

Living in Deep Time

 

Richard Rohr

Living in Deep Time

Men of all ages say Richard Rohr has given them a new way into spiritual depth and religious thought — through his writing and retreats. This conversation with the Franciscan spiritual teacher delves into the expansive scope of his ideas: male formation and what he calls “father hunger”; why contemplation is as magnetic to people now, including millennials, as it’s ever been; and how to set about taking the first half of life — the drive to “successful survival” — all the way to meaning.

Transcript

Ms. Tippett: You can listen again and share this conversation with Fr. Richard Rohr through our website, onbeing.org.

Ms. Tippett: I also experience in your writing — this is the way I wrote it down, and I don’t know if you say it this way — but one of the qualities of the first half of life or the early part of the spiritual life is dualistic thinking.

Fr. Rohr: Yes. That’s almost all we have left.

Ms. Tippett: Right, and that’s another way our culture is in the first half of life. But I kind of hear you saying also that contemplation is a very powerful antidote to dualistic thinking.

Fr. Rohr: Yes. Do you want me to talk about it?

Ms. Tippett: Yeah, yeah.

Fr. Rohr: Well, let me say, first of all, Krista, to cover my bases, I’m not going to say that dualistic thinking is bad, per se, and non-dual is good, or I’d be dualistic, wouldn’t I?

Ms. Tippett: [laughs] OK, I’ll hold you to that. All right.

Fr. Rohr: [laughs] So we’ve got to succeed at clear-headed, non-fuzzy thinking. That’s what education is about. And I want to say that, first of all, because so many people who come up to us religious folks and say, “God told me,” and, “I heard from the spirit,” you find out they think they’re at the non-dual level, but they really aren’t. Do you understand?

(It is very important to understand Rohr here. “God told me,” = dualistic = Me here, God there. It is like saying me and my dog, or wife or that mountain. Non-dual: there is nothing but God, or like he says in Falling Upward: “The self-same moment we find God in ourselves, we also find ourselves inside God”)

Ms. Tippett: Yeah.

Fr. Rohr: So the normal way to get us through the day — I just drove over here where I’m recording this from my house about 10 minutes away, and to turn right or left, I needed a good dualistic mind to even find the address or whatever it might be. So to get through the day, to be an engineer or a mechanic, a medical professional, you better have a good dualistic mind. But then you hit a ceiling, and it just doesn’t work. It doesn’t work.

But non-dual is where you move into both/and, where you don’t look for all-or-nothing thinking. And we’re seeing it in our political debates today. It’s almost the only form of conversation left is all-or-nothing thinking. And it’s amazing to me that we could have this many universities in this country and could have this many churches and synagogues and mosques and have so many people still at such a low level of consciousness that they read everything in terms of either/or. And that’s why all of the world religions, not just Christianity, discovered that you needed a different kind of software to deal with mysterious things, holy things.

Ms. Tippett: And that software is contemplation.

Fr. Rohr: Is contemplation, the contemplative mind. (meer…)

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Namib se lyf

Die harde skoonheid van klip en sand in die Namib deur Hannelie se lens

Namibian Holiday 2017

Klip, soos n oopgebreekte lyf wat wegsyfer in die sand

Namibian Holiday 2017

Blinklyf onder die genadelose son

Namibian Holiday 2017

Duin en boom en berg, en die belofte van water in n droë pan

Namibian Holiday 2017

“To live life with integrity is the thing. And the purpose of art is to support that endeavour.” Enrique Martinez Celaya

Namibian Holiday 2017

 

Namibian Holiday 2017

Namibian Holiday 2017

It is dire poverty indeed when a man is so malnourished and fatigued that he won’t stoop to pick up a penny. But if you cultivate a healthy poverty and simplicity, so that finding a penny will literally make your day, then, since the world is in fact planted in pennies, you have with your poverty bought a lifetime of days. It is that simple.” Annie Dillard

Namibian Holiday 2017

“The sacred relationship with this moment flowers when we are not asking it to be other than it is. Then the beauty blossoms” Adyashanti

Namibian Holiday 2017

Namibian Holiday 2017

“I wish to speak a word for Nature, for absolute freedom and wildness, as contrasted with a freedom and culture merely civil – to regardman as an inhabitant, or part and parcel of Nature, rather than a member of society.” Henry David Thoreau: ‘Walking’

Van tyd tot tyd moet mens n klip kry om op te sit, of n bos of n woestyn om in te gaan loop, weg van die stad se geraas, sodat jy weer mens kan word.

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Hierdie onderhoud met Richard Rohr is een van die beste onderhoude wat ek in n lang tyd gelees het. Ek het voorheen hier iewers op die werf geskryf oor Rohr se boek “Falling Upward”.

Gegee die (Trump) tyd waarin ons leef, is dit nodig om weer na die wyse man se insigte te kyk.

Lees dit gerus met aandag en n oop gemoed. Ja ek weet, dit is n hele 6 bladsye lank na ek dit tot esensies verkort het, en meeste mense lees deesdae selde meer as 6 sinne. Ek kan jou belowe die een is die moete werd.

Lees en word wys.

Richard Rohr

Living in Deep Time

Men of all ages say Richard Rohr has given them a new way into spiritual depth and religious thought — through his writing and retreats. This conversation with the Franciscan spiritual teacher delves into the expansive scope of his ideas: male formation and what he calls “father hunger”; why contemplation is as magnetic to people now, including millennials, as it’s ever been; and how to set about taking the first half of life — the drive to “successful survival” — all the way to meaning.

Transcript

Krista Tippett, host: I’m not sure any living spiritual teacher has been recommended to me by more people across the years than Fr. Richard Rohr. Especially striking is how many men — diverse men — have told me they had trouble connecting to religion and spiritual practice, but that this Franciscan changed their lives, deepened their spirituality, helped grow them up. So, at long last, I’m here to draw him out.

And it’s a conversation with expansive scope, much like his teaching and writing — on why contemplation is as magnetic to people now, including millennials, as it’s ever been; on male spirituality and the epidemic of what he calls “father hunger;” and on the work of moving into what he describes as the second half of life. The first half is necessarily about survival, “successful survival,” and preoccupations like titles and prestige and possessions with a dualistic, either/or sensibility. But all of that doesn’t take us all the way to meaning, which is not a linear matter of age and time.

Fr. Richard Rohr: To be a contemplative is to learn to trust deep time and to learn how to rest there and not be wrapped up in chronological time. Because what you’ve learned, especially by my age, is that all of it passes away. The things that you’re so impassioned about when you’re 22 or 42 don’t even mean anything anymore, and yet, you got so angry about it or so invested in it. So, this word “contemplation,” it’s a different form of consciousness. It’s a different form of time. (meer…)

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Vanaf n grys en koue Luderitz en sand bedekte Kolmanskop gaan die reis voort deur Windhoek vir n blitsbesoek aan Swakopmund. Aangesien die seewater kouer is as die bier, bly hulle uit die water en hou by die bier.

Namibian Holiday 2017 Swakopmund

Van daar trek die kampeerders na die Kgalagadi Oorgrens Gemsbok Park toe. Kgalagadi “place of thirst” en oorkant die grens in Botswana waar die grootste gedeelte van die park lê is die dors groot, maar nie na water nie … hulle “frack” vir geld. Twee derdes van die park in Botswana is verkoop vir fracking, die moderne weergawe van die Bybelse pot lensiesop.

Namibian Holiday 2017

SCHOOL PRAYER (By Diane Ackerman)

In the name of daybreak
and the eyelids of morning
and the wayfaring moon
and the night when it departs,

Namibian Holiday 2017

I swear I will not dishonor
my soul with hatred
but offer myself humbly
as a guardian of nature,
as a healer of misery,
as a messenger of wonder
as an architect of peace.

Namibian Holiday 2017

In the name of the sun and its minors
and the day that embraces it
and the cloud veils drawn over it
and the uttermost night
and the male and the female
and the plants bursting with seed
and the crowning seasons of the firefly
and the apple, I will honor all life

Namibian Holiday 2017

—wherever and in whatever form
it may dwell—on Earth my home,
and in the mansions of the stars.

Namibian Holiday 2017

Namibian Holiday 2017

Namibian Holiday 2017

Die fotos is geneem deur Hannelie.

Die gedig: Diane Ackerman’s Poetic Invitation to Attentive Presence as a Means of Transcendence and Secular Spirituality

Uit haar bundel:

I Praise My Destroyer

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